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Insect Inspiration

One of the first things that I saw at the University of Strathclyde’s Centre for Ultrasonic Engineering (CUE) was a small collection of locusts, not exactly what I was expecting. CUE has a range of different specialities, from biomedical engineering to underwater sonar, but I was there to understand a new project focussed on improving … More


MAGAZINE RELEASE: Get yours at our Intro Events

It’s here. theGIST Magazine Issue 3. We are very proud of our newest publication, crafted with love and build on curiosity by our dedicated team of GISTers. In our third issue, we re-visit a series of captivating issues: the ever important debate of women in science academia with a critical look at the progress and … More


ZMapp

In the latest instalment of Just theGIST we talk in the context of the current Ebola outbreak about a promising treatment option by the drug ZMapp. We explain how ZMapp works and why it is raising so much hope.


Hello Potential GISTer!

There are many different ways to get involved with theGIST: writing, editing, artwork, podcasts, website, administration, videos, etc. Find out More



Mary Shelley’s Haber-Bosch Process

With the population ever-growing and resources strained, how will we feed ourselves in the future? This was the foreboding question posed by Dr. Haralampos Miras at the University of Glasgow as he shone a spotlight on the Haber-Bosch process – a longstanding and invaluable industrial technique for producing ammonia – as part of the recent … More


Therapeutic pollution: a different kettle of fish

When chemicals spill out into the world around us, we need to know what consequences they will have. In general, an opinion of “what doesn’t harm is fine” holds – both for ecotoxicological tests, used to determine the adverse effects of contaminants, and in the community overall. Indeed, it is quite intuitive. But what if … More


Henrietta Lacks: An Ordinary Woman with an Extraordinary Story

Henrietta Lacks was born on August 1st 1920, the ninth child in a poor black family of tobacco farmers in Virginia, USA. At the age of 30, Henrietta developed extremely aggressive cervical cancer. During her treatment she unknowingly donated her cancer cells, which are still growing to this day in laboratories worldwide. Henrietta never knew, … More


Magpies Don’t Favour Shiny Objects

Magpies like to steal shiny, metallic objects to make their nests, right? That’s how the age-old story goes. Rossini even penned an opera on the subject. The birds, part of the crow family, are often celebrated for their intelligence. Magpies are capable of storing food over winter and remembering its location, even remembering which other … More


Quantum Pigeonholes

Here’s a simple idea: You have three pigeons and only two pigeonholes. If you put the pigeons in the pigeonholes you’ll end up with at least one hole that contains two pigeons. Right? Now let’s consider quantum particles. What if you have three quantum particles and two boxes and you try the same thing? Well, … More


Concussion Crisis

With Glasgow playing host to a major upset in rugby sevens and Commonwealth Games history, we would hope that such a spectacle would increase participation in sports not so often in the public eye. But when it comes to high contact games such as rugby, great care must be exercised to ensure the well-being of … More


Podcast Episode 5

GISTers Debbie Nicol, Emilie Steinmark, Barry Robertson and Timothy Revell discuss some weird and wonderful science from Glasgow and the wider world. They start by looking at (and playing with) the new Lego Research Institute collection, followed by discussing the Haber process and how it has meant we can feed 7 billion people. They also … More


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