// Latest

Finding the Origins of Life in Space

Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy, the University of Cologne and Cornell University, have recently discovered a molecule with an important structure. By analysing light from space using spectroscopy with a radio telescope array, isopropyl cyanide was identified within the star forming region Sagittarius B2. With a similar structure of carbons as … More


Explorathon Videos VI

The GIST at Explorathon’14, interviewing researchers and giving them the opportunity to explain their research in 1 minute. As 2 500 members of the public descended on the Glasgow Science Centre to hear about cutting edge European research, we asked researchers to explain their work in only 1 minute. Giving you Just theGIST….


Peering into the Brain of Adolescent Suicide Victims

Despite the fact that adolescent suicide is a major public health issue, research which investigates its possible neurobiological causes is still sparse. However, so far, researchers have found some intriguing differences in the brain chemistry of adolescent suicide victims, compared to adult suicide victims. How would you determine whether adolescent suicide victims have abnormal brain … More


Hello Potential GISTer!

There are many different ways to get involved with theGIST: writing, editing, artwork, podcasts, website, administration, videos, etc. Find out More



The Conservation Beauty Pageant

I will be the first to admit that I am a fan of all things cute and cuddly. Send me a snow leopard adoption pack any day of the week, but a spider conservation trust? No thank you! We have an astonishing array of creatures and all of them contribute towards the big ecological system … More


Dirty are the windows through which we see the Universe

BICEP2’s claim of a detection of primordial gravitational waves amounts to a dust bowl On Friday 14th March 2014, a rumour started to spread among scientists that the BICEP2 collaboration were due to announce something extraordinary in a press conference to be held on the following Monday. The day of the leak being a Friday … More


We came, we saw, we conferenced

theGIST’s Science for Society conference is now over! We had an excellent day discussing and deliberating evidence based policy and the role of science in public policy. It was enlightening, invigorating and most of all entertaining. We hope that you enjoyed it as much as we did. Below are some pictures from the day courtesy of … More


Using Circulating Tumour Cells to Personalise Cancer Treatment

Rapid technological advances within the past decade now allow the isolation and analysis of individual tumour cells circulating in the blood stream of cancer patients. We are beginning to realise the potential of these cells, which carry the hallmarks of the patient’s tumour, in developing personalised treatments with the possibility of avoiding invasive biopsies. Tumours … More


Breaking the Chemist’s Back

As many of you will know, the definition of a chemist is “a scientist trained in the field of chemistry who studies both the properties and composition of chemicals and who studies the way that chemicals interact with other chemicals.” Contrary to what a hit American TV show (you know the one) would like you … More


A Quantum Conundrum

How secure do you feel on the internet? Like you’re dangling from a dangerously high precipice by the straps of your dungarees, while some piece of malevolent code holds scissors to the straps? Or perhaps like you’re curled up, warm and snug, under a blanket of encryption beside a crackling fire. For most of us, … More


Podcast 8: Explorathon – The Value of Suffering

Josh and Barry deliver another Science Bite from this year’s Explorathon event with the help of Dr. Jennifer Corns, a philosopher at the University of Glasgow. This time, we’re taking a journey into the mind to find out what benefits there might be to suffering… GIST Podcast #8 – The Value of Suffering by Thegist … More


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