Conference

Check out the details about our new exciting conference coming up very soon!

// Latest

Bug-eating: in practice

In our recent print issue, we introduced an interesting new addition to our cuisine: bugs. Timothy Revell proposed that we should get used to the idea of including insects in our diet as they are very nutritious, it is ethical in terms of both environmental sustainability and animal welfare, plus they are already consumed by … More


Corporate psychopaths talk their way up

When we think of psychopaths, we usually think of serial killers and cold-hearted murderers lurking on a dark back street. However, recent research suggests that many psychopaths occupy highly valued positions in our society. Instead of wearing a prison uniform, they put on a suit and their charming smile and get to business. Indeed, incidence … More


Explorathon Videos V

The GIST at Explorathon’14, interviewing researchers and giving them the opportunity to explain their research in 1 minute. As 2 500 members of the public descended on the Glasgow Science Centre to hear about cutting edge European research, we asked researchers to explain their work in only 1 minute. Giving you Just theGIST….


Hello Potential GISTer!

There are many different ways to get involved with theGIST: writing, editing, artwork, podcasts, website, administration, videos, etc. Find out More



Science for Society Article Competition

theGIST’s Science for Society Article Competition is finally here! Discussing the role of science and policy each article tackles the subject in a unique way. The top three articles will be presented at the conference, so read them all and vote for your favourite. More


Witnessing Vikings: What Science Can Tell Us

Recently, a three-year-old study resurfaced on the internet which made the feminists all squeal out in joy. The study had found, through osteological examination of skeletons, that Viking graves containing swords and shields, previously assumed by archaeologists to belong to men, in fact belonged to women. Naturally, this caused all sorts of speculation about the … More


Ada Lovelace Day

Baroness Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace, now commonly known as Ada Lovelace, because that’s too much of a mouthful, was the daughter of Lord Byron. Ada was a great mathematician and the catalyst that kick-started the understanding of the potential of Charles Babbage’s analytical engine. She wrote the first ever computer algorithm and, as … More


And the 2014 Nobel Prize in Medicine goes to…

Congratulations to John O’Keefe, May-Britt Moser and Edvard Moser on being awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their discoveries of the brain’s navigation system. How does our brain create maps of our environment to generate our orientation? John O’Keefe and May-Britt and Edvard Moser were awarded this year’s Nobel Prize in Medicine … More


Molehills to Mountains: The Problems of Scaling Up Chemistry

This snippet is (kind of) a sequel to The Disconnection Approach. Excellent news! The new drug that you (the pharmaceutical company) have painstakingly screened, synthesised, purified and tested in clinical trials has proven to be (more) effective (than placebo) in treating the desired disease, and has minimal side effects for patients. Bonus points if it … More


The Eyes Have It

Evolution has undeniably given us many gifts with which to conquer the world – legs fit for running away from danger, opposable thumbs for making and using tools, eyes to perceive our environments and clever brains to make sense of those perceived images – and it’s been a lengthy process in each case. Think about … More


Podcast episode 6: Explorathon – LiFi

Join Josh and Sydney – two of our newest GISTers – for the first in our short series of Explorathon 2014 flavoured science bites. Together, they talk to Stefan Videv from the University of Edinburgh about LiFi – an ambitious project which aims to to turn ordinary light into a high speed data source. LiFi … More


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