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Could your smartphone diagnose cancer?

In the developed world, cancer is the biggest killer of our age. Following many years of research and clinical experience, the current view is that early detection is the best possible means to tackle this formidable disease. If diagnosed and treated in the early stages, over 90% of patients survive beyond 10 years – this … More


Paws for Thought: Panda Pregnancy is a Tricky Business

Why is it so hard to get a panda pregnant? As many of us were saddened to find, Edinburgh Zoo’s own panda Tian Tian was confirmed not pregnant after briefly showing signs early this September. It is thought that the foetus may have been reabsorbed despite being expected to develop to full term, and offers … More


Towards Gender Equality in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics

  “So, what do you do?” It’s a question all of us ask and answer on a fairly regular basis, the default ice breaker when we’re introduced to a friend of a friend at a party or forced to make small talk at an event. “I’m an Athena SWAN Officer.” “Oh! Right…so is that like, … More


Hello Potential GISTer!

There are many different ways to get involved with theGIST: writing, editing, artwork, podcasts, website, administration, videos, etc. Find out More



When Scientists Meet Journalists

Scientists are rubbish at communicating their research outside of academia; at least that is the opinion I took in an article I wrote for theGIST’s Science for Society conference article competition. But others must have also agreed, because it was voted overall winner on the day. However, the good news for scientists is that there … More


Finding the Origins of Life in Space

Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy, the University of Cologne and Cornell University, have recently discovered a molecule with an important structure. By analysing light from space using spectroscopy with a radio telescope array, isopropyl cyanide was identified within the star forming region Sagittarius B2. With a similar structure of carbons as … More


The Conservation Beauty Pageant

I will be the first to admit that I am a fan of all things cute and cuddly. Send me a snow leopard adoption pack any day of the week, but a spider conservation trust? No thank you! We have an astonishing array of creatures and all of them contribute towards the big ecological system … More


Fungal Killer vs. Bacterial Champion: The Battle for Kermit’s Life

There is a killer out there, and its name is Chytrid… Well, actually it is Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). The spores of this aquatic fungus get under the skin, causing it to ulcerate and slough off abnormally, and it won’t be long before the eyes, muscles and skin start haemorrhaging. Pathogenic bacteria will soon colonise these … More


Differences in Gene Regulation Between Mice and Humans

Mammalians have around 25,000 genes, but only 62% of the human genome is transcribed in one or more cell types . Considering this, it’s possible to understand that the performance of a cell is not only determined by its gene set, but rather by which genes are active, which is highly variable among cells. All … More


Peering into the Brain of Adolescent Suicide Victims

Despite the fact that adolescent suicide is a major public health issue, research which investigates its possible neurobiological causes is still sparse. However, so far, researchers have found some intriguing differences in the brain chemistry of adolescent suicide victims, compared to adult suicide victims. How would you determine whether adolescent suicide victims have abnormal brain … More


Explorathon VIII

The GIST at Explorathon’14, interviewing researchers and giving them the opportunity to explain their research in 1 minute. As 2 500 members of the public descended on the Glasgow Science Centre to hear about cutting edge European research, we asked researchers to explain their work in only 1 minute. Giving you Just theGIST….


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