Two Fingers for Science?


Researchers believe they have found a link between the relative lengths of your index and ring fingers and a predisposition to the disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The disease is believed to be influenced by prenatal factors, although the precise aetiology is unknown. The relative lengths of your index and ring fingers (the 2D:4D ratio) indicate your level of exposure to prenatal testosterone. Hypothesising that high prenatal testosterone levels could be a factor in the development of ALS, the researchers tested this by examining the 2D:4D ratio of patients and their findings appear to support their theory. A quick internet search revealed that there are over 20 research papers published in 2011 so far on the 2D:4D ratio as an indication of various medical and psychological conditions. There are also sites which link the ratio to a number of less scientific theories such as ability in exams. So how reliable are these results, and can your fingers really indicate anything other than how long your fingers are? The GIST podcasters tackle this topic in their latest offering of GIST-y goodness.

Tell your friends!Share on Facebook0Tweet about this on Twitter0Share on Google+0Share on LinkedIn0
Discuss

Author

// Felicity Carlysle is a 2nd year Forensic Science PhD student at the University of Strathclyde.

Creative Commons License Two Fingers for Science? by Felicity Carlysle is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

References


Other Articles

The Alice in Wonderland Syndrome

“I’m afraid I can’t put it more clearly,” Alice replied very politely, “for I can’t understand it myself, to begin with; and being so many different sizes in a day is very confusing.” (Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland) The Alice in Wonderland Syndrome was first described in 1955 by psychiatrist Dr. John Todd and refers … More


Mitochondrial donation – prevention for mitochondrial diseases

A change in UK law will soon allow Mitochondrial Donation – Michaela Mrschtik discusses the background of the technique that could change the lives of families affected by mitochondrial disease. More


Power Up Your Ideas Factory with Edinburgh International Science Festival

In 2015 Edinburgh International Science Festival transforms into The Ideas Factory – a hub for information, ideas and innovation. Audiences are invited to get their thinking caps on as big ideas transform the halls, galleries, theatres and gardens of Edinburgh from 4 – 19 April. In 2015 the Science Festival focuses on big ideas and … More


Researchers make headway in organ-on-a-chip technology

Developments at the Wyss Institute, Harvard, have made a major step towards personalised medicines, but their research may even be leaping towards reducing the use of animals in science. Probably the most prominent ethical concern over biomedical research among scientists – and the public – is the use of animals. One of the more uncomfortable … More


Discussion

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Fields marked with an * are required. By commenting you consent to us placing cookies on your computer.





You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>